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Perfect in Powder 4 – Don’t Sit Back

In this photo Todd demonstrates well a key trick of the best powder pros—don’t sit back! Notice how his hips are well up over his feet. He could be skiing slalom. You can coach yourself by paying attention to where you feel pressure in the boot. Move your bum and hips forward and avoid heel … More »

Perfect in Powder 3 – Speed Will Set You Free

Have you noticed how fast many of the powder pros ski? It’s not just because they are pros, it’s also because turns are more effortless with speed. Increasing speed is the easiest non-technical way to get the turns flowing. Choose a slope free of obstacles and crank it up. by MARTIN OLSEN in the Winter … More »

Perfect in Powder 2 – Suck, Don’t Blow

Real powder doesn’t have a solid base underfoot, which means that trying to push off or hop is an ineffective waste of energy. Novices try to bounce, while experts bend (or suck up) their legs and relax between turns. Wide skis try to float to the surface, so relaxing the legs will allow them to … More »

It’s All About the Feet … or is it? pt. 2

In the steeps by MATT BARNES  * photos: ADAM STEIN  *  snow: Laax, Switzerland The analogy of “holding a tray of drinks downhill” is an easy one to visualize because let’s face it, most of us can relate to drinking. But once you’re able to ensure the turning effort is coming from the legs and … More »

It’s All About the Feet .. or is it? pt.1

The analogy of “holding a tray of drinks downhill” is an easy one to visualize because let’s face it, most of us can relate to drinking. But once you’re able to ensure the turning effort is coming from the legs and not from swinging your arms and upper body around, can you forget about your … More »

Why Skis Turn

You may find that I constantly harp on the idea of edging the ski to turn when it seems more intuitive to “turn” the skis to turn, but there is good reason for this. Modern skis for groomed slopes have a pronounced hourglass shape compared to skis of a few decades ago. Even backcountry skis … More »

Bend the Inside Leg

Think of applying weight to your working ski by bending the other leg. The secret to getting expert levels of edging is to flex the uphill leg to shift weight and allow room to move the downhill boot into higher edge angles. Part II of this secret is to keep your legs fairly close so … More »

Anatomy of an Expert Turn

Expert or “performance” turns are not for everyone, but if your goal is to ski like the world’s best (including Silver Star’s Rodger Poole), start with these reference points.   by MARTIN OLSON   A—Keep your uphill shoulder and arm up and forward instead of letting your shoulder drop and fall back. B—Keep the uphill … More »

Speed Bumps

 by Martin Olson in December 2014 issue Moguls have become an endangered species at most resorts, but they can be fun when you find them. One of the shortest roads to a ski instructors’ fistfight is to advocate a particular technique in bumps, so think of this as an option. Events such as the Olympics … More »

Four Common Myths of Skiing

MYTH 1 – GOOD SKIERS USE A WIDE STANCE A common error seen in good skiers who are trying to improve is skiing with feet too far apart. It can be confusing because when you look at the photos here, the feet are fairly far apart even though the stance is narrow. A narrow stance … More »

Perfect in Powder 4 – Don’t Sit Back

In this photo Todd demonstrates well a key trick of the best powder pros—don’t sit back! Notice how his hips are well up over his feet. He could be skiing slalom. You can coach yourself by paying attention to where you feel pressure in the boot. Move your bum and hips forward and avoid heel … More »

Perfect in Powder 3 – Speed Will Set You Free

Have you noticed how fast many of the powder pros ski? It’s not just because they are pros, it’s also because turns are more effortless with speed. Increasing speed is the easiest non-technical way to get the turns flowing. Choose a slope free of obstacles and crank it up. by MARTIN OLSEN in the Winter … More »

Perfect in Powder 2 – Suck, Don’t Blow

Real powder doesn’t have a solid base underfoot, which means that trying to push off or hop is an ineffective waste of energy. Novices try to bounce, while experts bend (or suck up) their legs and relax between turns. Wide skis try to float to the surface, so relaxing the legs will allow them to … More »

It’s All About the Feet … or is it? pt. 2

In the steeps by MATT BARNES  * photos: ADAM STEIN  *  snow: Laax, Switzerland The analogy of “holding a tray of drinks downhill” is an easy one to visualize because let’s face it, most of us can relate to drinking. But once you’re able to ensure the turning effort is coming from the legs and … More »

It’s All About the Feet .. or is it? pt.1

The analogy of “holding a tray of drinks downhill” is an easy one to visualize because let’s face it, most of us can relate to drinking. But once you’re able to ensure the turning effort is coming from the legs and not from swinging your arms and upper body around, can you forget about your … More »

Why Skis Turn

You may find that I constantly harp on the idea of edging the ski to turn when it seems more intuitive to “turn” the skis to turn, but there is good reason for this. Modern skis for groomed slopes have a pronounced hourglass shape compared to skis of a few decades ago. Even backcountry skis … More »

Bend the Inside Leg

Think of applying weight to your working ski by bending the other leg. The secret to getting expert levels of edging is to flex the uphill leg to shift weight and allow room to move the downhill boot into higher edge angles. Part II of this secret is to keep your legs fairly close so … More »

Anatomy of an Expert Turn

Expert or “performance” turns are not for everyone, but if your goal is to ski like the world’s best (including Silver Star’s Rodger Poole), start with these reference points.   by MARTIN OLSON   A—Keep your uphill shoulder and arm up and forward instead of letting your shoulder drop and fall back. B—Keep the uphill … More »

Speed Bumps

 by Martin Olson in December 2014 issue Moguls have become an endangered species at most resorts, but they can be fun when you find them. One of the shortest roads to a ski instructors’ fistfight is to advocate a particular technique in bumps, so think of this as an option. Events such as the Olympics … More »

Four Common Myths of Skiing

MYTH 1 – GOOD SKIERS USE A WIDE STANCE A common error seen in good skiers who are trying to improve is skiing with feet too far apart. It can be confusing because when you look at the photos here, the feet are fairly far apart even though the stance is narrow. A narrow stance … More »

Subscribe and SAVE!

Just $3.75 an issue!

1 year (4 issues) for $15 + tax!

Outside Canada?