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Remembering Mike

For good reason, most people remember Mike Wiegele for his renowned heli-ski operation in Blue River, B.C. I remember him as my coach, mentor and inspiration during the years I worked at the Lake Louise Ski school. I was at the Lake Louise Ski Club meeting the day Mike was introduced as the new ski … More »

Parablacks: Seemed Like a Good Idea

50th Anniversary looking back Back in the day, when the epitome of style was skiing with feet and legs glued together as one on skinny, unshaped 207s, there was an increased risk of crossing one’s ski tips. The solution, we were told and sold, was a clever little accessory called Parablack, which consisted of a … More »

In Defence of Narrow Skis

  ‘‘I’d noticed a direct relationship between pain, snow hardness and ski width… ’’ Repeated visits to an orthopaedic surgeon revealed exactly how my knees had worn with time. This got me to wondering how much my life of skiing had to do with my knee problems. I’d noticed a direct relationship between pain, snow hardness … More »

Perfect in Powder 4 – Don’t Sit Back

In this photo Todd demonstrates well a key trick of the best powder pros—don’t sit back! Notice how his hips are well up over his feet. He could be skiing slalom. You can coach yourself by paying attention to where you feel pressure in the boot. Move your bum and hips forward and avoid heel … More »

Perfect in Powder 3 – Speed Will Set You Free

Have you noticed how fast many of the powder pros ski? It’s not just because they are pros, it’s also because turns are more effortless with speed. Increasing speed is the easiest non-technical way to get the turns flowing. Choose a slope free of obstacles and crank it up. by MARTIN OLSEN in the Winter … More »

Perfect in Powder 2 – Suck, Don’t Blow

Real powder doesn’t have a solid base underfoot, which means that trying to push off or hop is an ineffective waste of energy. Novices try to bounce, while experts bend (or suck up) their legs and relax between turns. Wide skis try to float to the surface, so relaxing the legs will allow them to … More »

Perfect in Powder 1 – Use Wide Skis

It may seem too obvious, but powder snow is where wide skis actually make sense. The float provided by skis that are more than 100mm wide underfoot really do make skiing powder easier and less fatiguing. But don’t let beautiful ski photography fool you—off-piste snow is not always friendly. Wind- or sun-damaged snow and the … More »

Be Your Own Coach

Being aware of rotation isn’t enough to correct it. Rotation is the result of the skier trying to turn his or her skis. Skis should turn the skier, not the other way around. by Martin Olson in December 2015 issue What direction is your torso facing? Wendy demonstrates one of the more obvious errors that … More »

Why Skis Turn

You may find that I constantly harp on the idea of edging the ski to turn when it seems more intuitive to “turn” the skis to turn, but there is good reason for this. Modern skis for groomed slopes have a pronounced hourglass shape compared to skis of a few decades ago. Even backcountry skis … More »

Bend the Inside Leg

Think of applying weight to your working ski by bending the other leg. The secret to getting expert levels of edging is to flex the uphill leg to shift weight and allow room to move the downhill boot into higher edge angles. Part II of this secret is to keep your legs fairly close so … More »

Remembering Mike

For good reason, most people remember Mike Wiegele for his renowned heli-ski operation in Blue River, B.C. I remember him as my coach, mentor and inspiration during the years I worked at the Lake Louise Ski school. I was at the Lake Louise Ski Club meeting the day Mike was introduced as the new ski … More »

Parablacks: Seemed Like a Good Idea

50th Anniversary looking back Back in the day, when the epitome of style was skiing with feet and legs glued together as one on skinny, unshaped 207s, there was an increased risk of crossing one’s ski tips. The solution, we were told and sold, was a clever little accessory called Parablack, which consisted of a … More »

In Defence of Narrow Skis

  ‘‘I’d noticed a direct relationship between pain, snow hardness and ski width… ’’ Repeated visits to an orthopaedic surgeon revealed exactly how my knees had worn with time. This got me to wondering how much my life of skiing had to do with my knee problems. I’d noticed a direct relationship between pain, snow hardness … More »

Perfect in Powder 4 – Don’t Sit Back

In this photo Todd demonstrates well a key trick of the best powder pros—don’t sit back! Notice how his hips are well up over his feet. He could be skiing slalom. You can coach yourself by paying attention to where you feel pressure in the boot. Move your bum and hips forward and avoid heel … More »

Perfect in Powder 3 – Speed Will Set You Free

Have you noticed how fast many of the powder pros ski? It’s not just because they are pros, it’s also because turns are more effortless with speed. Increasing speed is the easiest non-technical way to get the turns flowing. Choose a slope free of obstacles and crank it up. by MARTIN OLSEN in the Winter … More »

Perfect in Powder 2 – Suck, Don’t Blow

Real powder doesn’t have a solid base underfoot, which means that trying to push off or hop is an ineffective waste of energy. Novices try to bounce, while experts bend (or suck up) their legs and relax between turns. Wide skis try to float to the surface, so relaxing the legs will allow them to … More »

Perfect in Powder 1 – Use Wide Skis

It may seem too obvious, but powder snow is where wide skis actually make sense. The float provided by skis that are more than 100mm wide underfoot really do make skiing powder easier and less fatiguing. But don’t let beautiful ski photography fool you—off-piste snow is not always friendly. Wind- or sun-damaged snow and the … More »

Be Your Own Coach

Being aware of rotation isn’t enough to correct it. Rotation is the result of the skier trying to turn his or her skis. Skis should turn the skier, not the other way around. by Martin Olson in December 2015 issue What direction is your torso facing? Wendy demonstrates one of the more obvious errors that … More »

Why Skis Turn

You may find that I constantly harp on the idea of edging the ski to turn when it seems more intuitive to “turn” the skis to turn, but there is good reason for this. Modern skis for groomed slopes have a pronounced hourglass shape compared to skis of a few decades ago. Even backcountry skis … More »

Bend the Inside Leg

Think of applying weight to your working ski by bending the other leg. The secret to getting expert levels of edging is to flex the uphill leg to shift weight and allow room to move the downhill boot into higher edge angles. Part II of this secret is to keep your legs fairly close so … More »

Quick Links

Subscribe and SAVE!

Just $5.00 an issue!

1 year (4 issues) for $20 + tax! Outside Canada is additional for postage.