Ski Canada Magazine

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Frontside 2012

The ski industry considers Frontside skiers as those who dream of sugar-coated waffles—corduroy bathed in a shimmering layer of fresh flakes. Their playground lies under and near the lifts, where access is best and fall lines are guaranteed. The innovations for these skiers come clearly in the form of rocker technology, which promises easier turn … More »

Ski geometry

Ski Geometry 101

Heart of the matter As the ski industry pushes its boundaries, skis, boots and bindings have followed suit. Behind every astounding pro trick, you’ll find an army of engineers looking to produce better-suited technology. The result is an ever-growing skier’s lexicon. Here’s some of base information on keywords like sidecut, radius and camber as well … More »

Buyer’s Guide 2011

Every January the global ski industry convenes in North America for international bragging rights. After 37 years of Las Vegas playing host, the dog and pony show was moved to Denver’s spectacular Colorado Convention Center last year where some 845 brands exposed their latest and greatest—and Ski Canada was there to look, listen, poke and … More »

All Mountain skis 2010

All-Mountain All-Mountain is the broadest category out there, and it can mean just about everything. As the popularity of going sidecountry booms, many of the big brands are making skis to fi t the category. When choosing a ski, figure out what All-Mountain means to you. K2, for example, states that its All-Mountain boards are … More »

Big-mountain life

For as long as I can remember, I’ve dreamt about flying or falling anyway (in a sky-diving sort of way). I also regularly dream about skiing, but the scenario quickly morphs into a lot of flying above treetops, lift towers, mountain peaks and so on. Frustratingly, only occasionally are my skis touching powder, never under … More »

Big Mountain 2010

“Big-Mountain” means huge snow. Forget carve and grip; think slash and smear. Skis needpop, and tails that respond to that deal-breaking question: “Did he stick the landing?” K2’s BackSide line, sold flat (without bindings), is indicative of the trend throughout the industry, especially for the genre leader K2. Rossignol’s Phantom line does just the same, offering four … More »

Women and skis 2010

Women and Skis Manufacturers have picked sides in the debate. And they all agree: yes, women are different from men. Theirs is a biological argument, claiming a woman’s centre of mass is anatomically much lower than a man’s. Thus the all-important and complex issues of stance and ski geometry need reviewing. Several industrial corollaries, or … More »

Best of the Test

All 2007 Ski Test data is available for subscribers at www.skicanadamag.com, so there’s not much point ?lling pages with numbers again—but maybe it’s worth reviewing some highlights. BEST TUNING There is an unofficial competition going on among suppliers to turn out the killer tune that makes their skis feel the best they can. At Ski … More »

Looking Back

Many of us claim to dream about skiing. But how many of us regularly dream—by that I mean have visions during deep REM sleep—about skiing? I’ll be the ? rst to admit that although I daydream endlessly about future days on the hill, set lofty goals and aspirations for the upcoming season, and generally structure … More »

Frontside 2012

The ski industry considers Frontside skiers as those who dream of sugar-coated waffles—corduroy bathed in a shimmering layer of fresh flakes. Their playground lies under and near the lifts, where access is best and fall lines are guaranteed. The innovations for these skiers come clearly in the form of rocker technology, which promises easier turn … More »

Ski geometry

Ski Geometry 101

Heart of the matter As the ski industry pushes its boundaries, skis, boots and bindings have followed suit. Behind every astounding pro trick, you’ll find an army of engineers looking to produce better-suited technology. The result is an ever-growing skier’s lexicon. Here’s some of base information on keywords like sidecut, radius and camber as well … More »

Buyer’s Guide 2011

Every January the global ski industry convenes in North America for international bragging rights. After 37 years of Las Vegas playing host, the dog and pony show was moved to Denver’s spectacular Colorado Convention Center last year where some 845 brands exposed their latest and greatest—and Ski Canada was there to look, listen, poke and … More »

All Mountain skis 2010

All-Mountain All-Mountain is the broadest category out there, and it can mean just about everything. As the popularity of going sidecountry booms, many of the big brands are making skis to fi t the category. When choosing a ski, figure out what All-Mountain means to you. K2, for example, states that its All-Mountain boards are … More »

Big-mountain life

For as long as I can remember, I’ve dreamt about flying or falling anyway (in a sky-diving sort of way). I also regularly dream about skiing, but the scenario quickly morphs into a lot of flying above treetops, lift towers, mountain peaks and so on. Frustratingly, only occasionally are my skis touching powder, never under … More »

Big Mountain 2010

“Big-Mountain” means huge snow. Forget carve and grip; think slash and smear. Skis needpop, and tails that respond to that deal-breaking question: “Did he stick the landing?” K2’s BackSide line, sold flat (without bindings), is indicative of the trend throughout the industry, especially for the genre leader K2. Rossignol’s Phantom line does just the same, offering four … More »

Women and skis 2010

Women and Skis Manufacturers have picked sides in the debate. And they all agree: yes, women are different from men. Theirs is a biological argument, claiming a woman’s centre of mass is anatomically much lower than a man’s. Thus the all-important and complex issues of stance and ski geometry need reviewing. Several industrial corollaries, or … More »

Best of the Test

All 2007 Ski Test data is available for subscribers at www.skicanadamag.com, so there’s not much point ?lling pages with numbers again—but maybe it’s worth reviewing some highlights. BEST TUNING There is an unofficial competition going on among suppliers to turn out the killer tune that makes their skis feel the best they can. At Ski … More »

Looking Back

Many of us claim to dream about skiing. But how many of us regularly dream—by that I mean have visions during deep REM sleep—about skiing? I’ll be the ? rst to admit that although I daydream endlessly about future days on the hill, set lofty goals and aspirations for the upcoming season, and generally structure … More »

Subscribe and SAVE!

Just $3.75 an issue!

1 year (4 issues) for $15 + tax!

Outside Canada?