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Ski Better, Snow School // April 4, 2012 // By


by Chris Lennon from Spring 2012 issue

 

Lift lines are notorious for bumps, drops and challenging terrain, as well as providing a resort’s best stage. Here on the ultimate lift line—the Peak 2 Peak—I’ve encountered a decent-size bump that drops sharply on the backside. Though nothing to be overly concerned about, it’s the kind of thing that can disrupt your rhythm if you don’t use your lower body effectively to maintain your balance.

 

1. Features like this must be absorbed using all three joints: ankles, knees and hips. While the knees and hips will likely flex instinctively, your ankles, locked inside rigid boots, may not. Focus on flexing the ankles to allow your feet to move back under your body as your skis climb the bump.

 


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Ski Better, Snow School // // By


by Chris Lennon from Spring 2012 issue

 

Lift lines are notorious for bumps, drops and challenging terrain, as well as providing a resort’s best stage. Here on the ultimate lift line—the Peak 2 Peak—I’ve encountered a decent-size bump that drops sharply on the backside. Though nothing to be overly concerned about, it’s the kind of thing that can disrupt your rhythm if you don’t use your lower body effectively to maintain your balance.

 

1. Features like this must be absorbed using all three joints: ankles, knees and hips. While the knees and hips will likely flex instinctively, your ankles, locked inside rigid boots, may not. Focus on flexing the ankles to allow your feet to move back under your body as your skis climb the bump.

 


Leave a Reply

Tags: , , , ,

Subscribe and SAVE!

Just $3.75 an issue!

1 year (4 issues) for $15 + tax!

Outside Canada?