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tips on technique

Topple Like There’s No Tomorrow

A ski is a simple machine: put it on edge, apply a little pressure and it will turn. The tricky part in skiing is transitioning from one edge to the other. Let’s look at one of the many possible ways of doing this. This “topple” of the mass across the skis is achieved by bending … More »

What’s Your Angle?

what's your angle?

Without “angulation,” all ski instructors have to our credit is pretty skiing, honed buttocks and livers that look like old leather saddlebags. Webster’s may have added it to the dusty corners of its dictionary in 1869, but it’s the lowly ski instructor who can take credit for keeping the term alive. So even if you’re … More »

Ski Better With a Pack

When heading into the wilds, make sure you carry first aid along with your snow safety equipment, and know how to use it all. Leave your plans with someone not heading out. The best safety measure you can make in terms of skiing is to drop it down a few gears. If you like to … More »

Hands: Save ‘Em For Après

Instructors are often asked, “Where should my arms be?” Back in the day, ski instructors could make an entire season out of endlessly and minutely adjusting the arms of their students. Those days are thankfully gone. In today’s more enlightened times, it has finally been recognized that the primary purpose of our hands in skiing … More »

Carve Like It’s the Sunday Roast

We ask skiers at our ski camps about their goals for the week. Many tell us they want to “ski like an expert,” but they don’t have a specific goal in mind. We like to come up with something definable. After all, expert skiers make changes to their moves and tactics as they move around … More »

Rotational Angulation

In skiing, often our main goal is to link a series of turns to create a sequence. While generally round, these turns can take many shapes, depending on our speed (fast, medium, slow or anywhere in-between) and the slope (steep, moderate or flat). For instance, on a steep slope going at a fast speed you … More »

Get a Grip

Understanding angulation and inclination is key to controlling your skidding. One of the main reasons people sign up for a ski lesson is because they have trouble gripping on hard or icy snow. The solution to this anxiety-inducing sideways sliding is to develop effective edging. The majority of skiers intuitively understand that tipping their skis … More »

Adapt – or faceplant

Let’s be honest. We all faceplant from time to time. While it’s tempting to blame the snow, the root cause is really our failure to anticipate changes in the snow and therefore change our approach. by Nigel HARISON CSIA III, CSCF II  *  photos: SECTION 8 SNOWSPORTS  *  snow: Villarica and Llaima volcanoes, Chile Any given … More »

Perfect in Powder 4 – Don’t Sit Back

In this photo Todd demonstrates well a key trick of the best powder pros—don’t sit back! Notice how his hips are well up over his feet. He could be skiing slalom. You can coach yourself by paying attention to where you feel pressure in the boot. Move your bum and hips forward and avoid heel … More »

Perfect in Powder 3 – Speed Will Set You Free

Have you noticed how fast many of the powder pros ski? It’s not just because they are pros, it’s also because turns are more effortless with speed. Increasing speed is the easiest non-technical way to get the turns flowing. Choose a slope free of obstacles and crank it up. by MARTIN OLSEN in the Winter … More »

tips on technique

Topple Like There’s No Tomorrow

A ski is a simple machine: put it on edge, apply a little pressure and it will turn. The tricky part in skiing is transitioning from one edge to the other. Let’s look at one of the many possible ways of doing this. This “topple” of the mass across the skis is achieved by bending … More »

What’s Your Angle?

what's your angle?

Without “angulation,” all ski instructors have to our credit is pretty skiing, honed buttocks and livers that look like old leather saddlebags. Webster’s may have added it to the dusty corners of its dictionary in 1869, but it’s the lowly ski instructor who can take credit for keeping the term alive. So even if you’re … More »

Ski Better With a Pack

When heading into the wilds, make sure you carry first aid along with your snow safety equipment, and know how to use it all. Leave your plans with someone not heading out. The best safety measure you can make in terms of skiing is to drop it down a few gears. If you like to … More »

Hands: Save ‘Em For Après

Instructors are often asked, “Where should my arms be?” Back in the day, ski instructors could make an entire season out of endlessly and minutely adjusting the arms of their students. Those days are thankfully gone. In today’s more enlightened times, it has finally been recognized that the primary purpose of our hands in skiing … More »

Carve Like It’s the Sunday Roast

We ask skiers at our ski camps about their goals for the week. Many tell us they want to “ski like an expert,” but they don’t have a specific goal in mind. We like to come up with something definable. After all, expert skiers make changes to their moves and tactics as they move around … More »

Rotational Angulation

In skiing, often our main goal is to link a series of turns to create a sequence. While generally round, these turns can take many shapes, depending on our speed (fast, medium, slow or anywhere in-between) and the slope (steep, moderate or flat). For instance, on a steep slope going at a fast speed you … More »

Get a Grip

Understanding angulation and inclination is key to controlling your skidding. One of the main reasons people sign up for a ski lesson is because they have trouble gripping on hard or icy snow. The solution to this anxiety-inducing sideways sliding is to develop effective edging. The majority of skiers intuitively understand that tipping their skis … More »

Adapt – or faceplant

Let’s be honest. We all faceplant from time to time. While it’s tempting to blame the snow, the root cause is really our failure to anticipate changes in the snow and therefore change our approach. by Nigel HARISON CSIA III, CSCF II  *  photos: SECTION 8 SNOWSPORTS  *  snow: Villarica and Llaima volcanoes, Chile Any given … More »

Perfect in Powder 4 – Don’t Sit Back

In this photo Todd demonstrates well a key trick of the best powder pros—don’t sit back! Notice how his hips are well up over his feet. He could be skiing slalom. You can coach yourself by paying attention to where you feel pressure in the boot. Move your bum and hips forward and avoid heel … More »

Perfect in Powder 3 – Speed Will Set You Free

Have you noticed how fast many of the powder pros ski? It’s not just because they are pros, it’s also because turns are more effortless with speed. Increasing speed is the easiest non-technical way to get the turns flowing. Choose a slope free of obstacles and crank it up. by MARTIN OLSEN in the Winter … More »

Quick Links

Subscribe and SAVE!

Just $5.00 an issue!

1 year (4 issues) for $20 + tax! Outside Canada is additional for postage.