Ski Canada Magazine

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Fit to Ski – part 1

BY MARCY VERBURG  Photos Wally Stemberger   Many of us do little or no dryland training in the off-season, which can result in muscle soreness, fatigue and injury, or just make our first few days on-slope unpleasant. But this can be remedied. Skiing isn’t like any other sport; you need to train for it specifically. … More »

Let’s Talk About Feelings

Becoming a great skier is about learning from experience, considering past performance, thinking about what went right but, equally important, what went wrong. Most skiers base their attempts at analysis in outcomes. It’s easy to point to results such as “Holy smokes, I slayed those bumps,” or perhaps more often, “Oh man, I just couldn’t … More »

Adapt – or faceplant

Let’s be honest. We all faceplant from time to time. While it’s tempting to blame the snow, the root cause is really our failure to anticipate changes in the snow and therefore change our approach. by Nigel HARISON CSIA III, CSCF II  *  photos: SECTION 8 SNOWSPORTS  *  snow: Villarica and Llaima volcanoes, Chile Any given … More »

Perfect in Powder 4 – Don’t Sit Back

In this photo Todd demonstrates well a key trick of the best powder pros—don’t sit back! Notice how his hips are well up over his feet. He could be skiing slalom. You can coach yourself by paying attention to where you feel pressure in the boot. Move your bum and hips forward and avoid heel … More »

Perfect in Powder 3 – Speed Will Set You Free

Have you noticed how fast many of the powder pros ski? It’s not just because they are pros, it’s also because turns are more effortless with speed. Increasing speed is the easiest non-technical way to get the turns flowing. Choose a slope free of obstacles and crank it up. by MARTIN OLSEN in the Winter … More »

Perfect in Powder 2 – Suck, Don’t Blow

Real powder doesn’t have a solid base underfoot, which means that trying to push off or hop is an ineffective waste of energy. Novices try to bounce, while experts bend (or suck up) their legs and relax between turns. Wide skis try to float to the surface, so relaxing the legs will allow them to … More »

Perfect in Powder 1 – Use Wide Skis

It may seem too obvious, but powder snow is where wide skis actually make sense. The float provided by skis that are more than 100mm wide underfoot really do make skiing powder easier and less fatiguing. But don’t let beautiful ski photography fool you—off-piste snow is not always friendly. Wind- or sun-damaged snow and the … More »

It’s All About the Feet .. or is it? pt.1

The analogy of “holding a tray of drinks downhill” is an easy one to visualize because let’s face it, most of us can relate to drinking. But once you’re able to ensure the turning effort is coming from the legs and not from swinging your arms and upper body around, can you forget about your … More »

Terrain and Turn Shape

Tip and Photos by John Schwirtlich Often when skiers drop into the deep, they make the same old turn regardless of the terrain steepness or snow conditions. But the pitch of a particular run as well as the conditions (whether it’s deep powder, hardpack or ice) should dictate your turn shape. Here, Mike Wiegele heli-ski guide … More »

Turning in the Deep

Skiing powder is all flow, not fighting with the elements. by Felix Tanguay It’s about going deep, feeling the resistance of the snow against your whole body while flying into the next turn. It’s almost like being weightless, and letting gravity do her magic. Here are a few tips to help get that flow (and … More »

Fit to Ski – part 1

BY MARCY VERBURG  Photos Wally Stemberger   Many of us do little or no dryland training in the off-season, which can result in muscle soreness, fatigue and injury, or just make our first few days on-slope unpleasant. But this can be remedied. Skiing isn’t like any other sport; you need to train for it specifically. … More »

Let’s Talk About Feelings

Becoming a great skier is about learning from experience, considering past performance, thinking about what went right but, equally important, what went wrong. Most skiers base their attempts at analysis in outcomes. It’s easy to point to results such as “Holy smokes, I slayed those bumps,” or perhaps more often, “Oh man, I just couldn’t … More »

Adapt – or faceplant

Let’s be honest. We all faceplant from time to time. While it’s tempting to blame the snow, the root cause is really our failure to anticipate changes in the snow and therefore change our approach. by Nigel HARISON CSIA III, CSCF II  *  photos: SECTION 8 SNOWSPORTS  *  snow: Villarica and Llaima volcanoes, Chile Any given … More »

Perfect in Powder 4 – Don’t Sit Back

In this photo Todd demonstrates well a key trick of the best powder pros—don’t sit back! Notice how his hips are well up over his feet. He could be skiing slalom. You can coach yourself by paying attention to where you feel pressure in the boot. Move your bum and hips forward and avoid heel … More »

Perfect in Powder 3 – Speed Will Set You Free

Have you noticed how fast many of the powder pros ski? It’s not just because they are pros, it’s also because turns are more effortless with speed. Increasing speed is the easiest non-technical way to get the turns flowing. Choose a slope free of obstacles and crank it up. by MARTIN OLSEN in the Winter … More »

Perfect in Powder 2 – Suck, Don’t Blow

Real powder doesn’t have a solid base underfoot, which means that trying to push off or hop is an ineffective waste of energy. Novices try to bounce, while experts bend (or suck up) their legs and relax between turns. Wide skis try to float to the surface, so relaxing the legs will allow them to … More »

Perfect in Powder 1 – Use Wide Skis

It may seem too obvious, but powder snow is where wide skis actually make sense. The float provided by skis that are more than 100mm wide underfoot really do make skiing powder easier and less fatiguing. But don’t let beautiful ski photography fool you—off-piste snow is not always friendly. Wind- or sun-damaged snow and the … More »

It’s All About the Feet .. or is it? pt.1

The analogy of “holding a tray of drinks downhill” is an easy one to visualize because let’s face it, most of us can relate to drinking. But once you’re able to ensure the turning effort is coming from the legs and not from swinging your arms and upper body around, can you forget about your … More »

Terrain and Turn Shape

Tip and Photos by John Schwirtlich Often when skiers drop into the deep, they make the same old turn regardless of the terrain steepness or snow conditions. But the pitch of a particular run as well as the conditions (whether it’s deep powder, hardpack or ice) should dictate your turn shape. Here, Mike Wiegele heli-ski guide … More »

Turning in the Deep

Skiing powder is all flow, not fighting with the elements. by Felix Tanguay It’s about going deep, feeling the resistance of the snow against your whole body while flying into the next turn. It’s almost like being weightless, and letting gravity do her magic. Here are a few tips to help get that flow (and … More »

Subscribe and SAVE!

Just $5.00 an issue!

1 year (4 issues) for $20 + tax!

Outside Canada?