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Safer Gear – Buyer’s Guide 22

Buyer's Guide, Gear // 2021-10-12 // By

 We’re not the fun police or Astar, the Play Safe robot, but we also know injuries suck. The right gear can keep you skiing, instead of sidelined.

Sweet Protection Grimner 2Vi MIPS

Sweet Protection Grimner 2Vi MIPS

Lots of helmets claim to prevent brain injuries better than others, but Sweet Protection is one of the few companies that can put scientific data and rigorous testing behind its assertions. It’s too complicated to explain it all here, but SP has attempted to address impacts from just about every direction and type of fall with the construction of the Grimner, its top-of-the-line all-mountain lid, and from the internal documents we’ve seen it sounds like a legitimate claim. $400

KneeBinding

Whether you’re a beginner or World Cup downhiller, when it comes to ACL injuries the worst way to fall is to get in the backseat and spin out. This uniqute direction of force simply doesn’t release most bindings properly. The KneeBinding is the only one with two release mechanisms on the heelpiece—a third DIN setting—to release the binding before a potential ACL rupture happens. And in the meantime, if your thighs are telling you that your weight is too far back, think of your knees and get centred! From $399

Leki Spitfire 3D

Leki Spitfire

The same technology that makes the Spitfire 3D so convenient, helps prevent shoulder injuries, says Leki. Pole plant above a tree or into a pocket of soft snow, and your pole can hang up while the rest of your body keeps going. With a pole strap on, that can easily result in a dislocated shoulder—unless the strap automatically releases like this one. The Trigger 3D system separates pole and strap with a push on the top of the grip or with pull force within a 220-degree radius. $150

POC Dimensions VPD Backpack

POC Dimensions VPD

This slick little backpack has a 22-litre capacity with room for avalanche gear, water, food and extra layers. And the streamlined design rides nicely on ski lifts. But what really qualifies it for safety is the built-in body armour in the back padding. According to POC, it helps cushion and protect the back in different kinds of crashes. $240

from Buyer’s Guide 2022 issue

Tags: , , , , ,

Safer Gear – Buyer’s Guide 22

Buyer's Guide, Gear // // By


 We’re not the fun police or Astar, the Play Safe robot, but we also know injuries suck. The right gear can keep you skiing, instead of sidelined.

Sweet Protection Grimner 2Vi MIPS

Sweet Protection Grimner 2Vi MIPS

Lots of helmets claim to prevent brain injuries better than others, but Sweet Protection is one of the few companies that can put scientific data and rigorous testing behind its assertions. It’s too complicated to explain it all here, but SP has attempted to address impacts from just about every direction and type of fall with the construction of the Grimner, its top-of-the-line all-mountain lid, and from the internal documents we’ve seen it sounds like a legitimate claim. $400

KneeBinding

Whether you’re a beginner or World Cup downhiller, when it comes to ACL injuries the worst way to fall is to get in the backseat and spin out. This uniqute direction of force simply doesn’t release most bindings properly. The KneeBinding is the only one with two release mechanisms on the heelpiece—a third DIN setting—to release the binding before a potential ACL rupture happens. And in the meantime, if your thighs are telling you that your weight is too far back, think of your knees and get centred! From $399

Leki Spitfire 3D

Leki Spitfire

The same technology that makes the Spitfire 3D so convenient, helps prevent shoulder injuries, says Leki. Pole plant above a tree or into a pocket of soft snow, and your pole can hang up while the rest of your body keeps going. With a pole strap on, that can easily result in a dislocated shoulder—unless the strap automatically releases like this one. The Trigger 3D system separates pole and strap with a push on the top of the grip or with pull force within a 220-degree radius. $150

POC Dimensions VPD Backpack

POC Dimensions VPD

This slick little backpack has a 22-litre capacity with room for avalanche gear, water, food and extra layers. And the streamlined design rides nicely on ski lifts. But what really qualifies it for safety is the built-in body armour in the back padding. According to POC, it helps cushion and protect the back in different kinds of crashes. $240

from Buyer’s Guide 2022 issue

Tags: , , , , ,

Quick Links

Subscribe and SAVE!

Just $5.00 an issue!

1 year (4 issues) for $20 + tax! Outside Canada is additional for postage.