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Bend the Inside Leg

Think of applying weight to your working ski by bending the other leg. The secret to getting expert levels of edging is to flex the uphill leg to shift weight and allow room to move the downhill boot into higher edge angles. Part II of this secret is to keep your legs fairly close so … More »

Anatomy of an Expert Turn

Expert or “performance” turns are not for everyone, but if your goal is to ski like the world’s best (including Silver Star’s Rodger Poole), start with these reference points.   by MARTIN OLSON   A—Keep your uphill shoulder and arm up and forward instead of letting your shoulder drop and fall back. B—Keep the uphill … More »

Speed Bumps

 by Martin Olson in December 2014 issue Moguls have become an endangered species at most resorts, but they can be fun when you find them. One of the shortest roads to a ski instructors’ fistfight is to advocate a particular technique in bumps, so think of this as an option. Events such as the Olympics … More »

Four Common Myths of Skiing

MYTH 1 – GOOD SKIERS USE A WIDE STANCE A common error seen in good skiers who are trying to improve is skiing with feet too far apart. It can be confusing because when you look at the photos here, the feet are fairly far apart even though the stance is narrow. A narrow stance … More »

What’s wrong with rotation?

Rotation is a way for the skier to turn the skis with upper body movements. Here, Anne demonstrates one turn using edge angle and ski shape, and another using upper body twisting. The rotation symptoms of hips too square (90 degrees to skis) and tension in the right arm and shoulder are obvious when compared … More »

Gear That Made a Difference

As Ski Canada celebrates its 40th birthday this season, we thought a nostalgic look back each issue was an appropriate way to rejoice. Leading the sentimental season is a subject we all love to muse about: iconic ski equipment. Although everyone has a personal list of favourite gear, there are some real milestones that have shaped the direction … More »

Style File: Travel Guide 2009

Reach for the next turn Good skiers show a wide range of movement, but without coaching those movements can be misinterpreted. A good example is the situation pictured, where the skier is coming onto a flatter section at high speed. The body bends in the transition, but the extension of the legs is a reaching … More »

Expect the unexpected

Full StyleFile page layouts with images During this particular photo shoot at Lake Louise, we were constantly interrupted by snow squalls and flat light. Unexpectedly, the demonstrator gave a rare glimpse of what is possible at the highest level of expertise. Because his balance was perfect, he was able to hit an unseen bump and … More »

Best of the Test

All 2007 Ski Test data is available for subscribers at www.skicanadamag.com, so there’s not much point ?lling pages with numbers again—but maybe it’s worth reviewing some highlights. BEST TUNING There is an unofficial competition going on among suppliers to turn out the killer tune that makes their skis feel the best they can. At Ski … More »

Bend the Inside Leg

Think of applying weight to your working ski by bending the other leg. The secret to getting expert levels of edging is to flex the uphill leg to shift weight and allow room to move the downhill boot into higher edge angles. Part II of this secret is to keep your legs fairly close so … More »

Anatomy of an Expert Turn

Expert or “performance” turns are not for everyone, but if your goal is to ski like the world’s best (including Silver Star’s Rodger Poole), start with these reference points.   by MARTIN OLSON   A—Keep your uphill shoulder and arm up and forward instead of letting your shoulder drop and fall back. B—Keep the uphill … More »

Speed Bumps

 by Martin Olson in December 2014 issue Moguls have become an endangered species at most resorts, but they can be fun when you find them. One of the shortest roads to a ski instructors’ fistfight is to advocate a particular technique in bumps, so think of this as an option. Events such as the Olympics … More »

Four Common Myths of Skiing

MYTH 1 – GOOD SKIERS USE A WIDE STANCE A common error seen in good skiers who are trying to improve is skiing with feet too far apart. It can be confusing because when you look at the photos here, the feet are fairly far apart even though the stance is narrow. A narrow stance … More »

What’s wrong with rotation?

Rotation is a way for the skier to turn the skis with upper body movements. Here, Anne demonstrates one turn using edge angle and ski shape, and another using upper body twisting. The rotation symptoms of hips too square (90 degrees to skis) and tension in the right arm and shoulder are obvious when compared … More »

Gear That Made a Difference

As Ski Canada celebrates its 40th birthday this season, we thought a nostalgic look back each issue was an appropriate way to rejoice. Leading the sentimental season is a subject we all love to muse about: iconic ski equipment. Although everyone has a personal list of favourite gear, there are some real milestones that have shaped the direction … More »

Style File: Travel Guide 2009

Reach for the next turn Good skiers show a wide range of movement, but without coaching those movements can be misinterpreted. A good example is the situation pictured, where the skier is coming onto a flatter section at high speed. The body bends in the transition, but the extension of the legs is a reaching … More »

Expect the unexpected

Full StyleFile page layouts with images During this particular photo shoot at Lake Louise, we were constantly interrupted by snow squalls and flat light. Unexpectedly, the demonstrator gave a rare glimpse of what is possible at the highest level of expertise. Because his balance was perfect, he was able to hit an unseen bump and … More »

Best of the Test

All 2007 Ski Test data is available for subscribers at www.skicanadamag.com, so there’s not much point ?lling pages with numbers again—but maybe it’s worth reviewing some highlights. BEST TUNING There is an unofficial competition going on among suppliers to turn out the killer tune that makes their skis feel the best they can. At Ski … More »

Quick Links

Subscribe and SAVE!

Just $5.00 an issue!

1 year (4 issues) for $20 + tax! Outside Canada is additional for postage.