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Feedback // January 22, 2011 // By


Your Run – Winter 2011

YOUR RUN from Winter 2011 issue

BOOMERS ROCK!

» I liked Iain MacMillan’s online
editorial “Slicing and dicing
skiers”
(E-Blast #4, November
2010). I think you are quite on
the mark with your observations
as I am also baffled at the myopia
of beer and sports equipment
advertisers when it comes to
[dismissing] anyone over the
age of 25. It’s not a mystery that
yuppies have a rather large chunk
of purchasing power. If my peer
group is any indication, we spend
regularly on new gear and ski
travel. Personally, I keep hoping
that ski technology will continue
to improve fast enough to offset
my growing decrepitude.

BRIAN STEEVES, Fredericton

Ski Canada’s e-newsletter is always
free, just for the asking:
info@skicanadamag.com

COVER-UP

» Whenever I receive the latest
Ski Canada issue, it always
features a fantastic photo on the
cover. You guys must really enjoy
sifting through thousands of
great shots to select the best one
to don the cover. However time
and time again, the address label
covers up a portion of the photo.
Have you ever thought of putting
the label on the back cover? Or
would that upset the advertisers?

KENT KAWASAKI,
Newmarket, Ontario

ANYONE MISSING A KILT?

» As a great admirer of Franz
Klammer, there may be another
explanation for the 1,600-year-old
piece of tartan (“The
McKaiser,”
Short Turns, Fall
2010
). A world-travelling Scot
who lost his kilt in the peat
bog (for whatever reason!) or a
Scottish soldier who occupied
Carinthia in 1945 at the end of
World War II—of which I was
one. Incidentally, the tartan worn
by Franz appears to be McKenzie,
as worn by the Spencer family.

JIMMIE SPENCER, Vernon, B.C.

LOOK, MA—IT’S ME!

» I enjoyed Ski Canada’s Buyer’s
Guide 2011
issue and got a big
surprise reading the Park & Pipe
section
on page 60. There I am
doing my back-up trick, a trusty
old corked 5 with a mute. Thank
you for publishing this!

VINCENT MARTIN, Whistler

THROW THE BOOK AT ’EM

» Regarding the article “Crossing
the Line”
by Andrew Findlay in the
Buyer’s Guide 2011 issue, what is
its purpose? Are you promoting
breaking the law? Those in the
story should be charged, as should
you for paying for and publishing
the stupid story.
Olympic security and
backcountry skiing aren’t
something to joke about in the
future. The whole article was
senseless. I am not a lawyer or
with the police. I just do not see
any value in these types of stories.
I have been a subscriber to Ski
Canada
since the early ’70s.
I do not live in Toronto (I live
in beautiful Peachland) but I do
offer my sympathies to you. I
loved your story on Switzerland’s
Engadine.

CARMINE CONFALONE,
Peachland, B.C.

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN

» I read the “What ever happened
to…?”
letters in Your Run, Fall
2009
issue, and have another lost
ski area to add: Twin Oaks Ski
Club, Middleton (Annapolis Valley),
Nova Scotia. This 450-foot-vertical
hill had three runs and two rope
tows to take you to the top. It
was started by my wife’s father
around 1965 in collaboration with
personnel from the Greenwood
Military Base, who were skiers from
Quebec and B.C. My wife fondly
remembers skiing there every
weekend and still has her trophy
from one of the races they had.

PETER AND MARGRIET DE BRUYN,
Elizabethtown, Ontario

Feedback // // By


Your Run – Winter 2011

YOUR RUN from Winter 2011 issue

BOOMERS ROCK!

» I liked Iain MacMillan’s online
editorial “Slicing and dicing
skiers”
(E-Blast #4, November
2010). I think you are quite on
the mark with your observations
as I am also baffled at the myopia
of beer and sports equipment
advertisers when it comes to
[dismissing] anyone over the
age of 25. It’s not a mystery that
yuppies have a rather large chunk
of purchasing power. If my peer
group is any indication, we spend
regularly on new gear and ski
travel. Personally, I keep hoping
that ski technology will continue
to improve fast enough to offset
my growing decrepitude.

BRIAN STEEVES, Fredericton

Ski Canada’s e-newsletter is always
free, just for the asking:
info@skicanadamag.com

COVER-UP

» Whenever I receive the latest
Ski Canada issue, it always
features a fantastic photo on the
cover. You guys must really enjoy
sifting through thousands of
great shots to select the best one
to don the cover. However time
and time again, the address label
covers up a portion of the photo.
Have you ever thought of putting
the label on the back cover? Or
would that upset the advertisers?

KENT KAWASAKI,
Newmarket, Ontario

ANYONE MISSING A KILT?

» As a great admirer of Franz
Klammer, there may be another
explanation for the 1,600-year-old
piece of tartan (“The
McKaiser,”
Short Turns, Fall
2010
). A world-travelling Scot
who lost his kilt in the peat
bog (for whatever reason!) or a
Scottish soldier who occupied
Carinthia in 1945 at the end of
World War II—of which I was
one. Incidentally, the tartan worn
by Franz appears to be McKenzie,
as worn by the Spencer family.

JIMMIE SPENCER, Vernon, B.C.

LOOK, MA—IT’S ME!

» I enjoyed Ski Canada’s Buyer’s
Guide 2011
issue and got a big
surprise reading the Park & Pipe
section
on page 60. There I am
doing my back-up trick, a trusty
old corked 5 with a mute. Thank
you for publishing this!

VINCENT MARTIN, Whistler

THROW THE BOOK AT ’EM

» Regarding the article “Crossing
the Line”
by Andrew Findlay in the
Buyer’s Guide 2011 issue, what is
its purpose? Are you promoting
breaking the law? Those in the
story should be charged, as should
you for paying for and publishing
the stupid story.
Olympic security and
backcountry skiing aren’t
something to joke about in the
future. The whole article was
senseless. I am not a lawyer or
with the police. I just do not see
any value in these types of stories.
I have been a subscriber to Ski
Canada
since the early ’70s.
I do not live in Toronto (I live
in beautiful Peachland) but I do
offer my sympathies to you. I
loved your story on Switzerland’s
Engadine.

CARMINE CONFALONE,
Peachland, B.C.

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN

» I read the “What ever happened
to…?”
letters in Your Run, Fall
2009
issue, and have another lost
ski area to add: Twin Oaks Ski
Club, Middleton (Annapolis Valley),
Nova Scotia. This 450-foot-vertical
hill had three runs and two rope
tows to take you to the top. It
was started by my wife’s father
around 1965 in collaboration with
personnel from the Greenwood
Military Base, who were skiers from
Quebec and B.C. My wife fondly
remembers skiing there every
weekend and still has her trophy
from one of the races they had.

PETER AND MARGRIET DE BRUYN,
Elizabethtown, Ontario

Subscribe and SAVE!

Just $3.75 an issue!

1 year (4 issues) for $15 + tax!

Outside Canada?