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Ski Better, Ski Better, Snow School // January 10, 2013 // By


One Foot at a Time

by Chris Lennon from December 2012 issue

One of the things skiers have over our snowboard brethren is the ability to work our feet and legs independently simply because our feet aren’t locked onto a single board. This is an advantage when holding an edge on steep terrain (see “Knee the Steeps,” Spring 2012), but in this sequence I’m using my legs independently to help step into the air off a small feature.

photos: GILLIAN MORGAN * snow: Blackcomb

At times it’s helpful to drive the knee of one leg into the air, in much the same way you would make a lay-up in basketball (as opposed to springing straight up off two feet to snag a rebound).
Then spring into the air off the opposite foot

 

Ready, Set, Attack

There is often a tendency to over-analyze ski technique. At its core, all good, effective skiing is done while in balance. Of course there’s a bit more that goes into the mix, but when we’re out on the hill exploring new terrain and negotiating uneven or freshly blanketed and thus hidden obstacles, we don’t have time to think about all the finer details. We can, however, use certain tactics to help us stay in balance, and one that I regularly use is to envision myself attacking the slope as I would an opponent in football or an opponent’s serve in tennis. Rather than resting on my heels on the baseline, I picture myself on the balls of my feet [1] ready to pounce on and attack the obstacles in my way as I move down the slope [2]. As I clear each obstacle and continue to move forward and down the hill, I recoil and get ready to respond to the next feature that will keep me on my toes and wanting to come back for more

I picture myself on the balls of my feet [1] ready to pounce on and attack the obstacles in my way as I move down the slope [2]. As I clear each obstacle and continue to move forward and down the hill, I recoil and get ready to respond to the next feature that will keep me on my toes and wanting to come back for more [3].

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Ski Better, Ski Better, Snow School // // By


One Foot at a Time

by Chris Lennon from December 2012 issue

One of the things skiers have over our snowboard brethren is the ability to work our feet and legs independently simply because our feet aren’t locked onto a single board. This is an advantage when holding an edge on steep terrain (see “Knee the Steeps,” Spring 2012), but in this sequence I’m using my legs independently to help step into the air off a small feature.

photos: GILLIAN MORGAN * snow: Blackcomb

At times it’s helpful to drive the knee of one leg into the air, in much the same way you would make a lay-up in basketball (as opposed to springing straight up off two feet to snag a rebound).
Then spring into the air off the opposite foot

 

Ready, Set, Attack

There is often a tendency to over-analyze ski technique. At its core, all good, effective skiing is done while in balance. Of course there’s a bit more that goes into the mix, but when we’re out on the hill exploring new terrain and negotiating uneven or freshly blanketed and thus hidden obstacles, we don’t have time to think about all the finer details. We can, however, use certain tactics to help us stay in balance, and one that I regularly use is to envision myself attacking the slope as I would an opponent in football or an opponent’s serve in tennis. Rather than resting on my heels on the baseline, I picture myself on the balls of my feet [1] ready to pounce on and attack the obstacles in my way as I move down the slope [2]. As I clear each obstacle and continue to move forward and down the hill, I recoil and get ready to respond to the next feature that will keep me on my toes and wanting to come back for more

I picture myself on the balls of my feet [1] ready to pounce on and attack the obstacles in my way as I move down the slope [2]. As I clear each obstacle and continue to move forward and down the hill, I recoil and get ready to respond to the next feature that will keep me on my toes and wanting to come back for more [3].

Leave a Reply

Subscribe and SAVE!

Just $3.75 an issue!

1 year (4 issues) for $15 + tax!

Outside Canada?