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Ski Better, Snow School // April 7, 2014 // By


Mobility & Balance

 Skiing the bumps and crud has always been my favourite terrain. I love the inconsistency of it. When you ski this ever-changing canvas, you have to maintain a centred position to get the most out of your skis—no easy task. I focus on my feet or BOS (base of support). The ability to move the BOS throughout the turn shape helps my centre of mass maintain a smooth trajectory down the hill.

13067_SC_v42_#4_features_1.indd
photos: RYAN MCKENZIE

Next time you’re out skiing, try to focus on your BOS. Play around with pushing your feet forward and then pulling them back in your stance. To achieve this, think about moving your ankle joint. When you push your feet in front of you, put your calf against the back of your boot by pushing down on the balls of your feet, allowing your ankle joint to open up. Then pull your feet back under your centre of mass, flexing your ankle joint and applying pressure to the front of the boot. Both of these movements are done with just the lower body.

Play with these movements on friendly groomies. Throughout your turn shape, try moving your BOS around. Once you’re comfortable, take that into the bumps or crud. The ability to push your feet in front of you before hitting that bump or chop will allow your centre of mass to maintain balance. Once you’re on top of that bump, you can now pull your feet back under you, giving your upper body (centre of mass) a smooth uninterrupted trajectory down the slope.

BY DAVE GOLLOGLY in the Winter 2014 issue

Director of Winter Sports School,
Kimberley Alpine Resort


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Ski Better, Snow School // // By


Mobility & Balance

 Skiing the bumps and crud has always been my favourite terrain. I love the inconsistency of it. When you ski this ever-changing canvas, you have to maintain a centred position to get the most out of your skis—no easy task. I focus on my feet or BOS (base of support). The ability to move the BOS throughout the turn shape helps my centre of mass maintain a smooth trajectory down the hill.

13067_SC_v42_#4_features_1.indd
photos: RYAN MCKENZIE

Next time you’re out skiing, try to focus on your BOS. Play around with pushing your feet forward and then pulling them back in your stance. To achieve this, think about moving your ankle joint. When you push your feet in front of you, put your calf against the back of your boot by pushing down on the balls of your feet, allowing your ankle joint to open up. Then pull your feet back under your centre of mass, flexing your ankle joint and applying pressure to the front of the boot. Both of these movements are done with just the lower body.

Play with these movements on friendly groomies. Throughout your turn shape, try moving your BOS around. Once you’re comfortable, take that into the bumps or crud. The ability to push your feet in front of you before hitting that bump or chop will allow your centre of mass to maintain balance. Once you’re on top of that bump, you can now pull your feet back under you, giving your upper body (centre of mass) a smooth uninterrupted trajectory down the slope.

BY DAVE GOLLOGLY in the Winter 2014 issue

Director of Winter Sports School,
Kimberley Alpine Resort


Leave a Reply

Subscribe and SAVE!

Just $3.75 an issue!

1 year (4 issues) for $15 + tax!

Outside Canada?